Tag Archives: NYTimes

Survival Of The Fittest: Television As An Evoltionary Medium

In Sunday’s Business Section of the NYTimes, Randall Stross speculates on “why television still shines in a world or screens” as readers continue to disappear from print media; books, newspapers and magazines.

He states, “a tipping point has been passed in the competition between print and screen that has been under way since the beginnings of broadcast TV and now continues with video and other media.”

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New York Times Magazine Special: Multiscreen Mad Men

>>>The following is an interview from NYTimes magazine with BENJAMIN PALMER (the C.E.O. of the Barbarian Group, an Internet advertising and marketing firm based in Boston. He helped create the ‘‘Subservient Chicken’’ online campaign for Burger King), LARS BASTHOLM (chief creative officer at AKQA, where he has worked on campaigns for Xbox, Coca-Cola and Motorola) and ROBERT RASMUSSEN (executive creative director of the Nike account at R/GA, an agency that specializes in digital media. He has created campaigns for ESPN, Sega and JetBlue).<<<

I. THE END OF FLOW

Jack Hitt: I read a study recently suggesting that Americans now swim through most of their day looking at some kind of screen — screens on their cellphones, on their desks, in their kitchens, everything from digital billboards on the highway and in the back of a cab to the eruption of screens in urban centers. Times Square is no longer an unusual attraction; it’s the norm. The side of a building can now be made to broadcast video. There is hardly a public space left — a bar, a gym, the dentist’s office — that hasn’t been vanquished by some kind of screen. Now, let’s say I’ve got something to sell. This multiplicity of screens would seem to be a good thing, wouldn’t it?

Benjamin Palmer: What the proliferation of screens has done is give a bazillion creators the power to publish. There are now billions of hours of content, which means new places for advertisers to latch on to — lots of content that pockets of people find interesting. But the shift you’re describing makes things more complicated for advertisers too. When the TV networks held the reins for content, all advertising had to do was buy into the public consciousness of entertainment, which was television. Continue reading

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